SKU 363
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OPFERGANG (1944) * with improved, switchable English and Spanish subtitles* and improved film quality

Carl Raddatz, Kristina Söderbaum and Irene von Meyendorff, Veit Harlan
(1)
$14.99

Still from our previous recording:

Still from the new recording  (as of 06.10.15):

Still from tour previous recording:

Still from the new recording  (as of 06.10.15):

Re-recording of our original film with Spanish subtitles added; cleaning up and improvement of original English subtitles; and a better quality recording.

Die reiche temperamentvolle Aels aus dem Norden lebt am Hamburger Elbeufer. Neben ihr in einer Villa wohnt das frisch verheiratete Paar Albrecht und Octavia. Die Freundschaft zwischen Aels und Albrecht stört die Harmonie dieser Ehe nicht. Doch eines Tages bricht bei Aels ein altes Tropenleiden aus, sie fiebert, und weil sie ans Bett gefesselt ist, reitet Albrecht jeden Tag an ihrem Fenster vorbei und grüßt sie. Als aber auch er an einer Seuche erkrankt, übernimmt seine Frau Octavia diesen Liebesdienst und grüßt in seiner Reitkleidung die Kranke, um sie nicht zu beunruhigen. Doch die Ahnungslose stirbt an gebrochenem Herzen. Sie kann ohne Albrechts Liebe nicht leben – er erfährt es aus ihrem letzten Brief.

Aels, a rich and temperamental woman from the North, moves to Hamburg. She lives in a mansion besides the newly married couple, Alrecht and Octavia. The friendship between Aels and Albrecht does not disturb the harmony of this marriage. But soon, Aels has a reoccurrence of a tropical disease, and because she is confined to bed, Albrecht rides by each day on his horse to her window and inquires as to her health. When, eventually, he gets sick with an epidemic, his wife takes over this dear service and greets Aels in her riding clothes, pretending to be Albrecht and comforting the sick woman, so as to not worry her about Albrecht also being sick. Aels, however, is not completely fooled and ends up dying of a broken heart. It turns out, she cannot live without Albrecht's love -something Albrecht only finds about from her last letter to him before her death.

DVD-R IS 89 minutes long.  REGION FREE  (will play in any DVD player).

FILM QUALITY:  See both film samples below! 

AVAILABLE IN GERMAN WITH SWITCHABLE ENGLISH and SPANISH SUBTITLES.

Film Sample from Old Recording:

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Film Sample from New Recording

(as of 06.10.15):

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Opfergang, 3/16/2014 11:58 AM
From: pferde
I love this film dearly. In fact, I think it is a masterpiece of filmmaking. But my comment has little to do with the film as such, but rather with the subtitles of this copy.
On the whole, the subtitles of this and other copies from rarefilmsandmore are very good. The translations are well chosen and whoever undertook this daunting task knew what he [or she] was doing. Except for one instance and it is quite a "boo-boo", which can be seen on this copy. Towards the end of the film, in the scene with Aels [Soederbaum] and the notary, who is preparing her last will and testament, Aels asks "Is Freund Hein schon da?" Notary: "Freund Hein"? Aels: "Ja, er geht schon um's Haus". {Or something to that effect]. Freund HEIN appears twice in the dialogue and twice it is translated as Freund "HEIL". People who do not speak German will interpret this as having something to do with "the Fuehrer" [as in "Heil Hitler"], which would be a shame, besides making no sense. Nothing could be further from the truth. The word is HEIN [with an "n" at the end], not Heil!! The expression about "Freund Hein" dates back to Bismarck who, on his deathbed asked his physician "Ist Freund Hein schon im Zimmer?" The doctor answers "Nein, noch nicht, aber er geht schon um's Haus." In German death is often referred to as "Freund Hein". It has nothing to do with "Heil". We Germans would just as soon forget about THAT word.
I do not mean to be critical. I just thought it might help non-German  viewers who buy this disc to better understand that particular scene in the film.
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